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NC Native Plant Society:
Plant Details

Symphyotrichum pilosum var. pilosum [= Aster pilosus var. pilosus]

Hairy White Oldfield Aster, Frost Aster

Scientific Name:

Symphyotrichum pilosum var. pilosum [= Aster pilosus var. pilosus]

Genus:

Symphyotrichum

Species Epithet:

pilosum var. pilosum

Common Name:

Hairy White Oldfield Aster, Frost Aster

Plant Type

Herb/Wildflower

Life Cycle

Perennial

Plant Family

Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Native/Alien:

NC Native

Size:

0-1 ft., 1-3 ft.

Bloom Color(s):

White

Light:

Sun - 6 or more hours of sun per day

Soil Moisture:

Dry, Moist

Bloom Time:

August, September, October

Growing Area:

Mountains, Piedmont, Sandhills, Coastal Plain

Habitat Description:

Old fields, disturbed areas, woodland borders. Common throughout NC.

Leaf Arrangement:

Alternate

Leaf Retention:

Deciduous

Leaf Type:

Leaves veined, not needle-like or scale-like

Leaf Form:

Simple

Life Cycle:

Perennial

Wildlife Value:

Important for Wildlife

Landscape Value:

Suitable for home landscapes

Notes:

important food source for native bees

Blooms

image

Martha Baskin
Nantahala, NC
Sep '08

Blooms Close Up

Martha Baskin
Nantahala, NC
Sep '08

image

Blooms, Stem & Buds

image

Martha Baskin
Nantahala, NC
Sep '08

Entire Plant

image

Martha Baskin
Nantahala, NC
Mid Oct

Entire Plant replanted

image

Martha Baskin
Nantahala, NC
Sep '08

Plants can get large and bushy but look nice propped up against a structure

Orange County, NC

Bettina Darveaux

An important taxonomic feature are the involucre bracts. The tips of the bracts tend to roll inwards instead of laying flat. You can kind of see this in the picture.

Orange County, NC

Bettina Darveaux

Links:

USDA PLANTS Database Record

eFloras Plants NCSU Plants Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center



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